Info

Rosso di Verona

Growers: Mary Colombo and Brian Shipman, Wild Roots Farm
Chef: Leila Schneider, Cafe Olli
Bite:: Radicchio Fougasse

Rosso di Verona could perhaps be described as the cut- est of all varieties of radicchio. Shaped like a squashed football, heads of Verona are a deep crimson red with a thick, crunchy white midrib. The leaves are somewhat triangular and cup-shaped, perfect for filling with a delicious spread. They tend towards bitterness, although, as with all radicchio, they get sweeter as the weather gets colder in late fall and early winter.

Rosso di Verona was believed to have emerged in the mid to late 18th century in farming areas around the city of Verona. By the early 19th centu- ry, there is evidence that farmers began bringing it to market, rather than growing it just for personal use. It was often grown in the field in summer, then harvested with its roots on and stored in root cellars for forcing throughout the winter. Some stories describe farmers burying the stored plants in holes dug into composting manure piles, where the heat triggered the plants to put on new growth while the darkness accentuated its bright colors.

Add to Lightbox Download
Filename
2022_Sagra_del_Radicchio_0021.jpg
Copyright
Shawn Linehan. All Rights Reserved
Image Size
7163x4775 / 35.5MB
www.shawnlinehan.com https://www.photoshelter.com/support/license
https://www.shawnlinehan.com/contact
Contained in galleries
2022 Sagra del Radicchio
Growers: Mary Colombo and Brian Shipman, Wild Roots Farm     <br />
Chef: Leila Schneider, Cafe Olli<br />
Bite:: Radicchio Fougasse<br />
 <br />
Rosso di Verona could perhaps be described as the cut- est of all varieties of radicchio. Shaped like a squashed football, heads of Verona are a deep crimson red with a thick, crunchy white midrib. The leaves are somewhat triangular and cup-shaped, perfect for filling with a delicious spread. They tend towards bitterness, although, as with all radicchio, they get sweeter as the weather gets colder in late fall and early winter.<br />
<br />
Rosso di Verona was believed to have emerged in the mid to late 18th century in farming areas around the city of Verona. By the early 19th centu- ry, there is evidence that farmers  began bringing it to market, rather than growing it just for personal use. It was often grown in the field in summer, then harvested with its roots on and stored in root cellars for forcing throughout the winter. Some stories describe farmers burying the stored plants in holes dug into composting manure piles, where the heat triggered the plants to put on new growth while the darkness accentuated its bright colors.