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Pomodoro d'Inverno

Researcher: Amy Garrett, Dry Farming Institute
Seed Grower: Andrea Ghedina, Smarties.bio
Seed Grower: Brian Campbell, Uprising Seeds
Chefs: Dan and Elise Gold, Sebastiano's
Bite: Trapanese Pesto with Focaccia Toasts

Italian storage tomatoes, or "pomodoro d'inverno", are a class of tomatoes we are increasingly excited about. If you are not yet familiar with them, they tend to be saladette sized with firm thick flesh even when ripe. Picked ripe (or just slightly under-ripe) by the truss during the usual tomato season of late summer to early fall they are often then hung up with twine in large clusters, or alternatively laid in single layers in wooden boxes with good ventilation where they can store for up to 6 months to be used through the fall and winter. While they lack some of the depth of flavor of prime tomato season fruit, they bring bright acidity and fresh tomato presence to dishes long after it seems that season has past, providing a welcome diversification of tomato uses for the winter pantry. Perhaps what we miss the most at the end of tomato season is a quick and easy Pico de Gallo and this variety stretches that season several more months in our kitchen.
Many of these pomodoro d'inverno have their roots in the Italian south (perhaps the best known being 'Piennolo' from the volcanic soils of Vesuvius). 'Annarita' comes to us from our Italian friend and breeder Andrea Ghedina as part of our 'Gusto Italiano' collaboration with Smarties.bio and the Culinary Breeding Network. He was given the seed by Annarita, the tomato's namesake, whose father drove trains for a living and brought the seeds from Puglia 50 years ago when he moved north to Padova.

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2022 Sagra del Radicchio
Researcher: Amy Garrett, Dry Farming Institute<br />
Seed Grower: Andrea Ghedina, Smarties.bio<br />
Seed Grower: Brian Campbell, Uprising Seeds        <br />
Chefs: Dan and Elise Gold, Sebastiano's<br />
Bite: Trapanese Pesto with Focaccia Toasts<br />
<br />
Italian storage tomatoes, or "pomodoro d'inverno", are a class of tomatoes we are increasingly excited about. If you are not yet familiar with them, they tend to be saladette sized with firm thick flesh even when ripe. Picked ripe (or just slightly under-ripe) by the truss during the usual tomato season of late summer to early fall they are often then hung up with twine in large clusters, or alternatively laid in single layers in wooden boxes with good ventilation where they can store for up to 6 months to be used through the fall and winter. While they lack some of the depth of flavor of prime tomato season fruit, they bring bright acidity and fresh tomato presence to dishes long after it seems that season has past, providing a welcome diversification of tomato uses for the winter pantry. Perhaps what we miss the most at the end of tomato season is a quick and easy Pico de Gallo and this variety stretches that season several more months in our kitchen.<br />
Many of these pomodoro d'inverno have their roots in the Italian south (perhaps the best known being 'Piennolo' from the volcanic soils of Vesuvius). 'Annarita' comes to us from our Italian friend and breeder Andrea Ghedina as part of our 'Gusto Italiano' collaboration with Smarties.bio and the Culinary Breeding Network. He was given the seed by Annarita, the tomato's namesake, whose father drove trains for a living and brought the seeds from Puglia 50 years ago when he moved north to Padova.